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Updated: 17th November 2019 00:38HuffPost Personal

HuffPost Personal

Our culture’s preoccupation with gender isn’t healthy and it's holding all of us back.
Robert Rising, known to his clients as “the black lumberjack,” is dedicated to saving fallen trees and creating furniture out of rescued wood. Rising also seeks to break stereotypes around lumberjacks, and he mentors younger people of color who want to be part of an industry that often boxes them out.
Will I stay in Pittsburgh and be a pioneer for change, or will I leave to occupy spaces where I know my family will feel like they belong?

Living in a van never made me dangerous but a supervisor at the coffee chain forced me out because she thought it might.
I learned that it’s OK to not have my life revolve around my grandchildren.
I lived with a time bomb of a secret and I rarely told anyone what was happening to me, afraid they would think I was strange.
There is a belief, popularized by Trump and his supporters, that people like me are here to steal American jobs.
Society still holds tight to the worn adage of "never speak ill of the dead," which made it nearly impossible for me to share my story.
Abiodun Henderson helps formerly incarcerated youth grow mentally and professionally by getting their hands dirty.
In her new book, "The Witches are Coming," West dissects the cultural moment we're living in today — and how we got here.
Being a self-sufficient, modern woman doesn’t mean that you’ve necessarily learned ― or been taught ― about self-pleasure.
Though most of the people working there were true believers, there were some who seemed to understand things were not quite what they seemed.
Being there in that space seemed to give her something I hadn’t been able to before.
There’s a lot of loneliness in having someone discount who you are for something you can’t control.
What went on in our house — the dog waste, the roaches — was our burden to carry alone. No one could know who we really were.