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Updated: 31st December 1969 17:00Phone Hacking

Phone Hacking

The new legal action comes a few days after Meghan Markle announced she is suing the Mail on Sunday for publishing a private letter she wrote to her father.
Digital hygiene isn't much different from any other kind, but in the same way parents pass on common sense advice to wash your hands frequently during cold and flu season, it's crucial to learn about your various exposures and how to spot trouble when it happens.
As time passes following the FBI's announcement that it accessed the iPhone without Apple's help, I'm glad to see some of the answers are starting to take shape -- but the answers are not particularly good for Apple, or for the general public's right to privacy.
The San Bernardino terrorist suspect Syed Rizwan Farook used an iPhone 5c, which is now in the possession of the FBI. The iPhone is locked. The FBI wants Apple to help unlock it, presumably so they can glean additional evidence. Apple has declined.

A: I think the main result of Apple's confrontation with the FBI is that manufacturers are going to stop putting anything
FOR YEARS THE government has kept mum about its use of a powerful phone surveillance technology known as a stingray. Read
On Friday, the White House convened a “cyber summit” at Stanford’s campus in Palo Alto so that business and government leaders
The last several years have been good for criminal hackers and bad for consumers. From last year's unprecedented string of major retailer breaches to the massive JP Morgan hack and Sony's epic debacle, hackers have been almost unstoppable. So what should consumers expect for 2015?
For the most part, of course, technology today makes our lives simpler. Except when someone won't get off of our cloud, and we feel, as my friend said after losing her iPad, "lost, stupid, untethered, paranoid and violated."
In that bygone era of punched cards and tabulating machines, a computer disaster might have been a dropped box of cards. We couldn't do anything very exotic with these simple machines; the Internet and home computers were in no one's crystal ball, but neither was the worry of getting hacked.